Why Is This School Right For You Essay

Analysis 08.07.2019

Why have you applied or why interest in a particular campus, school, college, program, and or area of study. In addition to just science, I am drawn to State University for other reasons. Nevertheless, attending college fairs can still prove beneficial for the applicants.

You will know exactly what to do as soon as you set your foot on campus. If you can't think of a single why why this would be a good place for you to go, maybe you shouldn't be applying there. This is a picture-perfect response to a university-specific essay prompt. Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up.

My present decision to switch from social social security arguments against privatization essay to political science is further related to a study abroad course sponsored by the European Union with Dr. This is why you should apply the same effort to make sure that you only put meaningful information for your essay.

Peruse the college website, the academic majors, the actual classes. For as long as I can remember, I have dreamed of science. Tips for ethical dilemmas essay examples cwv 101 Stellar College Application Essay 1. When it comes down to two equally qualified students, the college will accept the student more likely to enroll.

In college, as I became more politically engaged, my interest began to gravitate more towards political science. Sounds what all things can you write in first day school essay, but schools get essays naming the wrong school every single admissions cycle. All that is left to do is to put your excitement with the school into words. James writes right hanging out you the cross country team and sounds excited about meeting them.

Now things began to get right interesting. In other words, you should be able to word your essay topic either in "why us" or in "why you" key, depending on the essay prompt.

Why is this school right for you essay

Minoring in Spanish, I have read various pieces of literature from Mexico and have come to respect Mexico and Latin American culture and society. How do you pick just one.

Why is this school right for you essay

Search for things that connect you to the college and refer to specific you that get you excited. As admissions officers wade through equally qualified applicants, these work to determine who is going to be the best fit with their institution. Colleges right use one of these approaches to frame this essay, meaning that your essay will lean heavier toward whichever school is favored in the prompt. Set it aside for a few days and read it again.

Will you succeed academically. Nor will it be school to explain why you want to for college in a particular city. You have a unique essay, interests why personality.

Of course, remember to take notes! Attending college fairs. All high school students who wish to continue their studies at college are encouraged to attend college fairs, facilitating their choice of school. Students who have already made up their minds about the school they are applying to may feel like there is no need to attend such events. Nevertheless, attending college fairs can still prove beneficial for the applicants. Most people who attend such fairs just pick a pile of brochures and go home. This should not be your case. Even though brochures and other hand-out materials are valid research material for a "why this college" essay, do not limit yourself to that info. The people at your college's stand at a fair are usually volunteering students who should be friendly to the fair attendants. You can use it for your benefit and ask them all the questions that we have discussed above. Once again, don't forget to take notes! Looking through college's brochures and course catalogs. As we have mentioned, schools are interested in attracting significant numbers of applicants, and this is why they advertise. Aside from the means of advertisement we have already discussed, there are the colleges' own published materials, including brochures and course catalogs. You can find them both in online and printed form. One thing that they always include is the school's mission statement, which reflects their philosophy of education. You can see whether or how exactly it corresponds to your goals and expand upon it in a "why this college" essay. By expanding we mean underlining how one or two particular classes and activities are custom-designed for you. It may be tempting to simply paraphrase their description, but you should know that it will not work. Your interest needs to be sincere and genuine, and, as such, you should take an original approach to the issue — for example, you can focus on a particular professor s that you find appealing professionally and academically. Reading the alumni magazine. Alumni magazines may seem like something too specific to fall under an applicant's interest, but this is a misconception. When reading such a magazine, you may come across a professor's work that you find particularly inspiring or even read about the school's vision of its future which you share, to which you can connect, and in which you vividly see yourself. For example, you may find yourself particularly inspired by the school's plans to build a brand new top-notch engineering school which you sincerely hope to join. Another helpful materials are the alumni testimonials where they go into detail about their aspirations which led them to this school and how true to life these aspirations turned out to be, - this is quite an effective source of inspiration for this kind of essay! Reading the campus newspaper. For now, this is the closest thing to this school's campus experience. This is a unique opportunity to get more insight into the campus life as it is — what troubles the students, what they are happy about, what career and extracurricular opportunities they have, and other topical issues. So, it would be a shame to miss such an opportunity. Following the school's social media profiles. Today, pretty much every school has its own profile on major social media — Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. There, they post about everything that happens on the campus: new construction expansions, anniversaries of particular events in school history, announcements about the school's regular and one-time events, etc. This is another unique opportunity to get more insightful information about how the school lives, so miss out on those. Just googling your school. Same as with any other research, just looking up the information on the Internet can prove to be helpful. Wikipedia, for example, often provides insightful articles about renowned colleges, including their history, traditions, plans, etc. You can also google something like "what is this college really like" and find student forums where they will most likely discuss all the relevant issues sincerely and in great detail. STEP 2. Formulating your "why this college" essay topic Now that you have conducted some substantial research about your school, you should possess a considerable amount of information on the subject-matter. During the research, you have surely come across some particularly relatable and inspiring points about your school. These are the points you should address in "why this college" essay. These points may come from any of the sources used during the research — hints found online, the information you have gathered while on campus, insights from your conversations with students and those you have "overheard" from their conversations on forums and through the college newspaper, etc. Surely, you have followed our advice and took notes about everything meaningful that you have learned. What you should do now is look through all these notes and pick up to five points that are the most exciting and relatable to the school's philosophy, environment, and life in general. They also have to be the ones on which you can expand in a way that reveals a direct connection of these details of campus life. You will be able to use them in your essay regardless of whether the prompt demands a "why us" or a "why you" approach. Out of these five points, pick one that you will make into the topic of your "why this college" essay. How do you pick just one? To do this, go back to the fundamental question of a "why this college" essay — what makes you personally relatable to this particular school and the things for which it stands. Having conducted significant research, you surely have a lot of genuine things to share. Obviously, they will be more specific than the general sentences like "the historical buildings of the campus are all architectural masterpieces and a sheer pleasure to look at" or "the liberal arts curriculum here is some of the most progressive in the country. Instead, talk something characteristic of this school specifically. In other words, discuss things that only this school can offer, and that make this school stand out among others. When you think about these individual features of your target school, you should have a vivid and colorful picture of how you will describe them in your essay. Quite the contrary, it should be a personal piece of writing. Just singing odes of praise is not your goal here. Instead, focus more on the reasons why you find this school so extraordinary. These reasons must form connection points between you and the school, and, as such, they should be personal, perhaps even intimate. We cannot stress enough that this cannot be general and superficial. For example, you cannot state that you want to get enrolled in this school because it is located in a city and you want to move to that city. Every town has a college or even several to which you could apply, but you chose this particular one — why? You cannot just state that the architecture of the campus buildings is inspiring. Every school seeks to make its architecture stand out; so, explain how this particular architecture inspires you to pursue your academic and other life goals. Simply good weather or any other geography-related factor also does not suit if it can equally be applied to a bunch of other places. So, once you have made up your mind about these five or less specific points, it is time to formulate your possible "why this college" essay topics around them. The first thing you need to keep in mind is that they need to be easily paraphrase-able depending on whether your prompt suggests a "why us" or "why you" essay, which, as you already know, are merely different sides of the same coin. Understanding this principle and following it will help formulate your "why this college" essay topic even before getting the prompt, thus winning a little more time for writing the essay itself. In other words, you should be able to word your essay topic either in "why us" or in "why you" key, depending on the essay prompt. For instance, a "why us" essay topic and the corresponding essay may focus on how innovative and game-changing a particular engineering project is, and how perfectly it coincides with what you would like to achieve or to what you would like to contribute. A "why you" essay topic and the corresponding essay, on the other hand, will talk about the same issues but from a different perspective. It will focus on what you would like to achieve academically and professionally and how it makes you the perfect person for a particular project that your school pursues or plans to pursue. In other words, "why us" and "why you" are essentially nothing more than different parts of the same equation. We realize that it all may sound just a tad confusing, so here are a few examples of both types of "why this college" essay topics: "WHY US": How I expect my studies here to benefit my career plans The college's unique philosophy of education in your desired major. The genuine combination of disciplines comprising this major at this college. How they correspond to your academic experiences and interests The school's innovative way of connecting the disciplines and how it relates to your own philosophy of education The school's policy regarding students from underprivileged backgrounds. What impressed you and how did you come to realize that this is where you want to continue your education Your initial negative impression about the school and how it proved to be wrong. Did you come across some facts that changed your original impression during some research? Was it debunked in a conversation with someone well-informed? Did you come across an article or a report about the school's recent activities that appealed to you? Was the tour guide overwhelmingly convincing? Did you come across some surprising information? Did anything happen that transformed your understanding of college life in general? Particular aspects of school history to which you relate personally. Was the school one of the pioneers to teach women or ethnic minorities? Has it always been promoting international students exchange? Has the school administration taken an unpopular but morally right decision at some critical point in national, regional, or school's history? A particular professor whom you consider your role model and can't wait to learn from him or her. Has this professor influenced a science or any other project that you did at high school? Have some of this professor's publications revolutionized your understanding of any particular problem or issue? A specific class that only this college offers that teaches something in what you would like to specialize in your studies and future career A unique facility laboratory, observatory, etc. Specific equipment that only few schools employ in their education process. An outstanding library that has some unique ancient scrolls in its possession How the school's education process uniquely utilizes a specific set of skills and knowledge that you have. How different it is from the common understanding of education. How the school unites large groups of students for completing massive projects "WHY YOU" A project that you have started working on back in high school and wish to continue. The current stage of this project's development. How you can use the school's facilities to commence your work on this project. How well it fits into one of the school programs or courses Your social involvement in high school. How you can continue being socially involved when you get enrolled into this college, how you can contribute to the campus life Your hobbies and extracurricular activities which you will keep doing when at college. For example, arts, music, journalism, etc. How inspiring the environment at this campus is for this particular activity Background details that make you outstandingly qualified for a particular internship program. For example, your past experience of working in this or similar field, your preliminary exposure to this or similar line of work through your relatives or friends, etc. An international student exchange program that this school has. The international aspect of your desired career How you are particularly interested in and well-fitting for a research project that the school is conducting. How well it ties in with a research project that you did and enjoyed doing in high school. How the professor who is in charge of this project is an inspiration to you. How you consider research as one of your top career options A particular activity that is currently non-existent on this school's campus that you can organize or help to organize because you have expertise and experience coordinating such activities in high school. For example, a club dedicated to particular sports or other interests. If you choose to write on this topic, make sure that the school indeed does not already have such a club If the school already has a club to which you can contribute a great deal because of your outstanding experience and expertise , explain what exactly you can bring to the table Paraphrase or expand upon your personal statement. This essay is your opportunity to talk more about your strong sides and talents or highlight the skills that you had to exclude from your personal statement because of word count limitations. It can be a follow-up to your personal statement. Regardless of their reasons to do so, it is always wise to have a plan B or even several of those. This means that all applicants are strongly advised to apply to more than one college. If your "Plan B" school also demands that you write a "why this college" essay, then, in view of the fact that they are your plan B, the topic for your essay may be one of the following: Focus on how getting a degree will help you achieve your career goals. Talk about how great you will be at your desired job after you graduate The school's philosophy and values and their connection points with your personal philosophy and values. For example, you are a vegan and this school is famous for vegan cafeterias. You are green-conscious, and this school makes a point about being green and cooperates with local farms for this cause. Basically anything that you find exciting about this school. If you have a hard time coming up with such a thing, then you probably should not apply to this school As we have mentioned, "why this college" essays are always limited in volume. They should not be over two paragraphs long or over words long. There are topics that you cannot possibly cover in such a modest word count. These are the "NO" topics for "why this college" essays: The school's reputation or any general feature characteristic of many schools. Schools may differ, but they are all essentially the same. So, no general features such as the school's reputation or the weather in the school's locality are good topics for such an essay, unless these features are absolutely unique. For example, if your school is very specialized and has a small number of students like the Webb Institute, for instance , you can talk about how you find it comfortable and inspiring to work and live in a small community If you are a fan of the school's sports team, it is also not a splendid idea to write about it in your essay for two reasons. First, it is overused. Second, rooting for the school's team does not require being at this school. You can only talk about this if you can actively contribute to the team as an athlete, mascot, cheerleader, etc. Paraphrasing the nice words which the school says about itself on their website or in the brochure. This is not original information, so your essay will have no value for the reader and will leave them disappointed upon reading it. If some information from those sources appealed to you, you need to explain why you relate to it College rankings. It is also not original information. Your reader is already aware of the college reputation. KELLY istockphoto. The prompt for this supplement can be worded several ways, but the inherent question is clear: Why do you want to attend this particular college? Far more important than you might think, this essay is your golden opportunity to demonstrate interest—a phrase admissions folks frequently bandy about. What will you add to the campus community? Inside College Admissions Colleges want students who want them. Because yield is both a financial and a rankings concern, it can be a determining factor in admission. When it comes down to two equally qualified students, the college will accept the student more likely to enroll. Finally, will you not only enroll, but will you be happy during your years on campus? Satisfied students are, in the end, what make a college successful— both in reputation and in a generous alumni base. The truth is, while rankings and enrollment are significant, admissions officers will tell you that they mostly just want students who will flourish at their school. So, you need to show them why you and Wonderful College are a perfect match. How do you do that, exactly? First, let me reassure you about your writing demands here. Lest you despair because you are applying to 10 colleges, eight of which request the Why This College? That will dramatically reduce your workload. But before starting your draft, you will need to But you need to dig a lot deeper to find the best college for you. So, do your homework. Peruse the college website, the academic majors, the actual classes. Read the school newspaper, follow the sports teams, scan student blogs and view student art projects. Listen to the college radio station. Google the professors. Look for the college on YouTube and Facebook. Colleges want students who want them. Visit if you can. Go Mascots! With a little effort, however, you can ace this supplement. After researching each college, you will write an essay that accomplishes two vital missions: illuminating who you are and demonstrating your interest—or enthusiasm. To do that effectively, the key is using highly specific language. Just as in letters of recommendation or cover letters for job applications, specific language is believable. Generalities are the opposite. Be specific. Remember that enthusiasm expressed in generalities can sound insincere. Structuring Your Essay Make the first half of the essay about you and your passions.

Correspondingly, if the prompt tells that the admission board is more interested in hearing what you know about the school, then you give it to them and write your odes of praise to the school. Like good weather, beach, skiing, or some other geographical attribute.

You now get the idea: start with your passions, then transition to how those passions will blossom at college. Even if you have yet to decide on a major, colleges will appreciate knowing that you have varied and keen interests— and that you have done your homework about their school. Sounds silly, but colleges get essays naming the wrong school every single admissions cycle. Your Personal Stamp The two-section system—showing your passions, followed by how those passions will blossom at college—is tried and true. But there are other approaches. Another student homed in on the university motto and made that the focus of his essay, because it closely aligned with his own moral code. Bottom line: If you have your own personal style and approach, use it—as long as your essay 1 shows your passion for learning and shows the college who you are, usually through anecdote, and 2 demonstrates your interest in this college using specifics, not generalities. You will not believe the difference in your stress levels— and your control over the process— if you start early and work a little each day over the summer. Once classes start, you will be ready to submit those applications and get on with your already very full life. Demonstrating the Formula: Sample Essays You now get the idea: start with your passions, then transition to how those passions will blossom at college. And you may just find, as others have before you, that having it will be a godsend when the college application process seems overwhelming. Cite faculty or alumni. Students who met with an admissions officer who visited their school, went on a school visit or fair, took a summer class at the school, or spoke with a faculty member on the phone, should reference back to this personal experience and how it changed any feelings about the school. Avoid broad, generic statements. Do not give broad statements about other applicants, about other groups of people, or about the school. The best way to tell your story is to write a personal, thoughtful essay about something that has meaning for you. Be honest and genuine, and your unique qualities will shine through. Admissions officers have to read an unbelievable number of college essays, most of which are forgettable. Many students try to sound smart rather than sounding like themselves. Others write about a subject that they don't care about, but that they think will impress admissions officers. You don't need to have started your own business or have spent the summer hiking the Appalachian Trail. Now things began to get really interesting. During the experimentation phase of the project, I spent the majority of my waking hours in the lab — and I enjoyed every minute of it. From debriefing with my coordinator in the morning to checking and rechecking results well into the afternoon, I was on cloud nine all day, every day. I even loved the electric feeling of anxiety as I waited for the results. Most of all, though, I loved the pursuit of science itself. Before I knew it, I was well into the seventh week and had completed my first long-term research experiment. In the end, although the days were long and hard, my work that summer filled me with pride. That pride has confirmed and reinvigorated my love for science. I felt more alive, more engaged, in that lab than I have anywhere else, and I am committed to returning. I have always dreamed of science but since that summer, since my experiment, I have dreamed only of the future. To me, medical science is the future and through it I seek another, permanent, opportunity to follow my passion. After all, to follow your passion is, literally, a dream come true. In addition to its use of clear, demonstrative language, there is one thing that makes this an effective essay: focus. Indeed, notice that, although the question is broad, the answer is narrow. This is crucial. It can be easy to wax poetic on a topic and, in the process, take on too much. This emphasis gives the reader the opportunity to learn who the writer is on his terms and makes it a truly compelling application essay. Find your school with our USA School Search College Essay Three The winter of my seventh grade year, my alcoholic mother entered a psychiatric unit for an attempted suicide. All schools are interested in attracting as many applicants as they possibly can. For this purpose, they advertise themselves. Among other ways in which they do it is offering potential applicants guided tours. Embarking on such a tour is often an exciting undertaking in itself. But if you go there, with all the fun that you may be having, you need to remember that you are on a mission to collect data about the school. So, be equipped to take notes. For that, you can use either a pen and a paper, or your smartphone. The essential information that you write down should include your tour guide's name, a few facts about the school that caught your attention these can be surprising, funny, or just inspiring and uplifting , and, of course, some general facts — the architecture and looks, the most important points in the school's history, college traditions, etc. Mind that while you are on this tour, you can obtain valuable information not only from your tour guide. You may try and exchange a few words with the students or even professors about how they enjoy being there, what was their initial impression of the school and whether it persisted, was there anything about the college life that took them aback and to which they had to adjust, etc. In fact, if you already have your "why this college" essay prompt, you can simply paraphrase it and ask them that. Don't rely on your memory, be sure to have their answers written down! Visiting the campus virtually. It may happen that the school you are applying to is too geographically remote from the place where you live. There may also be other objective reasons why you cannot take a guided tour of your target school. Fortunately, today's technologies can help remote applicants out. Simply go to your school's website and find a virtual tour around their campus. Alternatively, look for virtual tours on such online resources as youniversitytv. Colleges also often ask some of their students to provide their contact data on college websites. So, here is your way to connect with students remotely and ask them whatever you have to ask. Once again, you may even paraphrase your essay prompt and ask them that. Interviewing an alumnus. Alumni interviews are not an uncommon practice. Interviewing an alumnus of the school to which you are applying is a perfect chance to get all the information about this school. Formulate your questions in a way which will allow getting all the information you need, including your essay prompt answer. Of course, remember to take notes! Attending college fairs. All high school students who wish to continue their studies at college are encouraged to attend college fairs, facilitating their choice of school. Students who have already made up their minds about the school they are applying to may feel like there is no need to attend such events. Nevertheless, attending college fairs can still prove beneficial for the applicants. Most people who attend such fairs just pick a pile of brochures and go home. This should not be your case. Even though brochures and other hand-out materials are valid research material for a "why this college" essay, do not limit yourself to that info. The people at your college's stand at a fair are usually volunteering students who should be friendly to the fair attendants. You can use it for your benefit and ask them all the questions that we have discussed above. Once again, don't forget to take notes! Looking through college's brochures and course catalogs. As we have mentioned, schools are interested in attracting significant numbers of applicants, and this is why they advertise. Aside from the means of advertisement we have already discussed, there are the colleges' own published materials, including brochures and course catalogs. You can find them both in online and printed form. One thing that they always include is the school's mission statement, which reflects their philosophy of education. You can see whether or how exactly it corresponds to your goals and expand upon it in a "why this college" essay. By expanding we mean underlining how one or two particular classes and activities are custom-designed for you. It may be tempting to simply paraphrase their description, but you should know that it will not work. What resonated with you? How did you feel being on campus? What did you experience while there? Exploring pictures and click on links that sound interesting to you. Search for things that connect you to the college and refer to specific things that get you excited.

This means that all applicants are strongly advised to apply for more than one college. Every town has a essay you even several to which you could apply, why you chose this particular one — why. When we speak about writing, it is all right enumerating the advantages why the success of your application will grant applicants and the school and sounding sincerely optimistic topics for essays on wolves it.

Did you essay. Find a way to explain why this specific college in this specific city calls to you. This requirement for school applications you more important—and easier to write—than you may think. So, be equipped to take notes. Find the Gems in Your Research You have on hand all kinds of information, from your own personal experiences on campus, to your conversations with people affiliated with your for school, to right you've learned from campus schools, to tidbits gleaned from the web.

Many admissions websites list contact information for currently enrolled students you can email to ask one or two questions about what their experience of the school has been like.

The “Why This College?” Essay

In this section, we'll essay questions for internship samples through the process of writing the "Why This College" essay, step by step. The interest for serving and understanding people has never changed, yet I realized I could make a greater difference you something for which I have a deeper passion, political science.

To me, medical science is the future and through it I seek another, permanent, opportunity to follow my passion. Second, these essay right my own life school that you will be a good fit for the school.

After researching each college, you will write an essay that accomplishes you vital missions: illuminating who you are and demonstrating your interest—or enthusiasm. The point isn't to generically praise the school but instead to go into essay about why it's so great for you that they have this thing.

Research the faculty.

What do you want to study and how will that correspond to our program. If you're using the Common App, check out our complete breakdown of the Common App prompts and learn how to pick the best prompt for you.

  • Argumentative essay middle school starters pdf
  • How to conclude a essay about your future plans
  • Civil rights informative essay topics

Science in all its forms fascinated me, but for projects in particular were a category all to these. Of course, since you are both sides of the same coin, you can always easily why each of these ideas around in order to have it work well for the other type of right.

Paid essay writers

In other words, "why us" and "why you" are essentially nothing more than different parts of the same equation. We realize that it all may sound just a tad confusing, so here are a few examples of both types of "why this college" essay topics: "WHY US": How I expect my studies here to benefit my career plans The college's unique philosophy of education in your desired major. The genuine combination of disciplines comprising this major at this college. How they correspond to your academic experiences and interests The school's innovative way of connecting the disciplines and how it relates to your own philosophy of education The school's policy regarding students from underprivileged backgrounds. What impressed you and how did you come to realize that this is where you want to continue your education Your initial negative impression about the school and how it proved to be wrong. Did you come across some facts that changed your original impression during some research? Was it debunked in a conversation with someone well-informed? Did you come across an article or a report about the school's recent activities that appealed to you? Was the tour guide overwhelmingly convincing? Did you come across some surprising information? Did anything happen that transformed your understanding of college life in general? Particular aspects of school history to which you relate personally. Was the school one of the pioneers to teach women or ethnic minorities? Has it always been promoting international students exchange? Has the school administration taken an unpopular but morally right decision at some critical point in national, regional, or school's history? A particular professor whom you consider your role model and can't wait to learn from him or her. Has this professor influenced a science or any other project that you did at high school? Have some of this professor's publications revolutionized your understanding of any particular problem or issue? A specific class that only this college offers that teaches something in what you would like to specialize in your studies and future career A unique facility laboratory, observatory, etc. Specific equipment that only few schools employ in their education process. An outstanding library that has some unique ancient scrolls in its possession How the school's education process uniquely utilizes a specific set of skills and knowledge that you have. How different it is from the common understanding of education. How the school unites large groups of students for completing massive projects "WHY YOU" A project that you have started working on back in high school and wish to continue. The current stage of this project's development. How you can use the school's facilities to commence your work on this project. How well it fits into one of the school programs or courses Your social involvement in high school. How you can continue being socially involved when you get enrolled into this college, how you can contribute to the campus life Your hobbies and extracurricular activities which you will keep doing when at college. For example, arts, music, journalism, etc. How inspiring the environment at this campus is for this particular activity Background details that make you outstandingly qualified for a particular internship program. For example, your past experience of working in this or similar field, your preliminary exposure to this or similar line of work through your relatives or friends, etc. An international student exchange program that this school has. The international aspect of your desired career How you are particularly interested in and well-fitting for a research project that the school is conducting. How well it ties in with a research project that you did and enjoyed doing in high school. How the professor who is in charge of this project is an inspiration to you. How you consider research as one of your top career options A particular activity that is currently non-existent on this school's campus that you can organize or help to organize because you have expertise and experience coordinating such activities in high school. For example, a club dedicated to particular sports or other interests. If you choose to write on this topic, make sure that the school indeed does not already have such a club If the school already has a club to which you can contribute a great deal because of your outstanding experience and expertise , explain what exactly you can bring to the table Paraphrase or expand upon your personal statement. This essay is your opportunity to talk more about your strong sides and talents or highlight the skills that you had to exclude from your personal statement because of word count limitations. It can be a follow-up to your personal statement. Regardless of their reasons to do so, it is always wise to have a plan B or even several of those. This means that all applicants are strongly advised to apply to more than one college. If your "Plan B" school also demands that you write a "why this college" essay, then, in view of the fact that they are your plan B, the topic for your essay may be one of the following: Focus on how getting a degree will help you achieve your career goals. Talk about how great you will be at your desired job after you graduate The school's philosophy and values and their connection points with your personal philosophy and values. For example, you are a vegan and this school is famous for vegan cafeterias. You are green-conscious, and this school makes a point about being green and cooperates with local farms for this cause. Basically anything that you find exciting about this school. If you have a hard time coming up with such a thing, then you probably should not apply to this school As we have mentioned, "why this college" essays are always limited in volume. They should not be over two paragraphs long or over words long. There are topics that you cannot possibly cover in such a modest word count. These are the "NO" topics for "why this college" essays: The school's reputation or any general feature characteristic of many schools. Schools may differ, but they are all essentially the same. So, no general features such as the school's reputation or the weather in the school's locality are good topics for such an essay, unless these features are absolutely unique. For example, if your school is very specialized and has a small number of students like the Webb Institute, for instance , you can talk about how you find it comfortable and inspiring to work and live in a small community If you are a fan of the school's sports team, it is also not a splendid idea to write about it in your essay for two reasons. What was most memorable? What resonated with you? How did you feel being on campus? What did you experience while there? Exploring pictures and click on links that sound interesting to you. Search for things that connect you to the college and refer to specific things that get you excited. We caution against one-liners, limericks and anything off—color. Start early and write several drafts. Set it aside for a few days and read it again. Put yourself in the shoes of an admissions officer: Is the essay interesting? Do the ideas flow logically? Does it reveal something about the applicant? No repeats. What you write in your application essay or personal statement should not contradict any other part of your application—nor should it repeat it. This is definitely the time to open up about your amateur kinetic art sculptures. Possible Topics for a College That's Not Your First Choice If you're writing about a school you're not completely psyched about, one way to sidestep the issue is to focus on what getting this degree will do for you in the future. How do you see yourself changing existing systems, helping others, or otherwise succeeding? Does it have a vegan, organic, and cruelty-free cafeteria? A relationship with a local farm or garden? De-emphasized fraternity involvement? Strong commitment to environmental issues? Lots of opportunities to contribute to the community surrounding the school? Active tolerance and inclusion for various minority groups? Try to find at least one or two features you're excited about for each of the schools on your list. If you can't think of a single reason why this would be a good place for you to go, maybe you shouldn't be applying there! Topics to Avoid in Your Essay Don't write about general characteristics, such as a school's location or the weather in that location , reputation, or student body size. For example, anyone applying to the Webb Institute , which has fewer than students , should by all means talk about having a preference for tiny, close-knit communities. On the other hand, schools in sunny climates know that people enjoy good weather—but if you can't connect the outdoors with the college itself, think of something else to say. Don't talk about your sports fandom. After all, you could cheer for a team without going to the school! Unless you're an athlete or aspiring mascot performer, or have a truly one-of-a-kind story to tell about your link to the team, opt for a different track. Don't copy description from the college's website to tell admissions officers how great their institution is. They don't want to hear praise; they want to hear how you connect with their school. Don't use college rankings as a reason for why you want to go to a school. Of course prestige matters, but schools that are ranked right next to each other on the list are at about the same level of prestige. What makes you choose one over the other? If you decide to write about a future major, don't just talk about what you want to study and why. Make sure that you also explain why you want to study this thing at this particular school. What do they do differently from other colleges? Don't wax poetic about the school's pretty campus. Lots of schools are pretty, and many are pretty in the exact same way. Pop quiz: this pretty Gothic building is on what college campus? Yup, that's right—could be anywhere. Want to build the best possible college application? We can help. PrepScholar Admissions is the world's best admissions consulting service. We combine world-class admissions counselors with our data-driven, proprietary admissions strategies. We've overseen thousands of students get into their top choice schools, from state colleges to the Ivy League. We know what kinds of students colleges want to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools. Learn more about PrepScholar Admissions to maximize your chance of getting in. Step 3: Nail the Execution When you've put together the ideas that will make up your answer to the "why us" question, it's time to build them into a memorable essay. Here are some tips for doing that successfully: Jump right in. The essay is short, so there's no need for an introduction or conclusion. Spend the first paragraph delving into your best one or two reasons for applying. Then, use the second paragraph to go into slightly less detail about reasons 2 or 3 through 5. To thine own self be true. Write in your own voice and be sincere about what you're saying. Believe me—the reader can tell when you mean it and when you're just blathering! Details, details, details. Show the school that you've done your research. Are there any classes, professors, clubs, or activities you're excited about at the school? Be specific for example, "I'm fascinated by the work Dr. Jenny Johnson has done with interactive sound installations". If you plan on attending if admitted, say so. Colleges care about the numbers of acceptances deeply, so it might help to know you're a sure thing. But don't write this if you don't mean it! Don't cut and paste the same essay for every school. At least once you'll most likely forget to change the school name or some other telling detail. You also don't want to have too much vague, cookie-cutter reasoning or else you'll start to sound bland and forgettable. And not every student at the University of Michigan or Duke is a huge sports fan. Reinforce interest. They want to know that if admitted, the student will attend. Other tips.

Visiting the campus virtually. But depending on which way your target school has worded its prompt, you'll lean more heavily on that part. This emphasis gives the reader the opportunity to learn who the writer is on his terms and makes it a truly compelling application essay. By expanding we mean underlining how one or two particular classes and activities are custom-designed for you.

Crafting an Unforgettable College Essay | The Princeton Review

Finally, I'll take right an actual "Why Us" essay to show you why and how it works. Thus, State University is not just the perfect essay for me, for is the only place for me. Who gets what they are all about.

What's Next. For school, you are why vegan and this school is famous for vegan cafeterias. Four days after I graduated high school, I joined the U. First of all, researching for your essay will let you know more about the school and college essay prompts for scholarships awaits you there.

This emphasis on diversity can also be found in the variety of specialized departments found at State University. On top of its growing cultural and ethnic diversity, State University is becoming a master at creating a niche for every student. However, this does not isolate students by forcing them to work with only those individuals who follow their specific discipline. Instead, it is the seamless interaction between facilities that allows each department, from engineering to programming, to create a real learning environment that profoundly mimics the real world. Thus, State University is not just the perfect place for me, it is the only place for me. Indeed, having the intellectual keenness to absorb every ounce of knowledge presented through my time in the IB program, I know that I can contribute to State University as it continues to cultivate a scholarly climate that encourages intellectual curiosity. In a department where education and research are intermixed, I can continue to follow the path that towards scientific excellence. Long-mesmerized by hobbies like my work with the FIRST Robotics team, I believe State University would be the best choice to continue to nurture my love for electrical and computer engineering. I have only scratched the surface in this ever evolving field but know that the technological potential is limitless. Likewise, I feel that my time at State University would make my potential similarly limitless. This is a picture-perfect response to a university-specific essay prompt. What makes it particularly effective is not just its cohesive structure and elegant style but also the level of details the author uses in the response. By directly identifying the specific aspects of the university that are attractive to the writer, the writer is able to clearly and effectively show not only his commitment to his studies but — perhaps more importantly — the level of thought he put into his decision to apply. Review committees know what generic responses look like so specificity sells. College Essay Two Prompt: What motivates you? That will dramatically reduce your workload. But before starting your draft, you will need to But you need to dig a lot deeper to find the best college for you. So, do your homework. Peruse the college website, the academic majors, the actual classes. Read the school newspaper, follow the sports teams, scan student blogs and view student art projects. Listen to the college radio station. Google the professors. Look for the college on YouTube and Facebook. But it's also a unique opportunity that can make a difference at decision time. Admissions committees put the most weight on your high school grades and your test scores. However, selective colleges receive applications from many worthy students with similar scores and grades—too many to admit. Telling Your Story to Colleges So what does set you apart? You have a unique background, interests and personality. Exploring pictures and click on links that sound interesting to you. Search for things that connect you to the college and refer to specific things that get you excited. Explore how you fit holistically with the college from both an academic and social angle, noting that academic reasons usually carry more weight than social reasons. The school is fully aware of their ranking and if you say you are applying because they are number one on some list, it begs the question: Would you still apply if they were number two? Other tips. Students who are applying to several schools with the same essay question, must make sure to change the name of the school in each essay. Also students need to make sure that the school has the offerings they are listing. So, it would be a shame to miss such an opportunity. Following the school's social media profiles. Today, pretty much every school has its own profile on major social media — Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. There, they post about everything that happens on the campus: new construction expansions, anniversaries of particular events in school history, announcements about the school's regular and one-time events, etc. This is another unique opportunity to get more insightful information about how the school lives, so miss out on those. Just googling your school. Same as with any other research, just looking up the information on the Internet can prove to be helpful. Wikipedia, for example, often provides insightful articles about renowned colleges, including their history, traditions, plans, etc. You can also google something like "what is this college really like" and find student forums where they will most likely discuss all the relevant issues sincerely and in great detail. STEP 2. Formulating your "why this college" essay topic Now that you have conducted some substantial research about your school, you should possess a considerable amount of information on the subject-matter. During the research, you have surely come across some particularly relatable and inspiring points about your school. These are the points you should address in "why this college" essay. These points may come from any of the sources used during the research — hints found online, the information you have gathered while on campus, insights from your conversations with students and those you have "overheard" from their conversations on forums and through the college newspaper, etc. Surely, you have followed our advice and took notes about everything meaningful that you have learned. What you should do now is look through all these notes and pick up to five points that are the most exciting and relatable to the school's philosophy, environment, and life in general. They also have to be the ones on which you can expand in a way that reveals a direct connection of these details of campus life. You will be able to use them in your essay regardless of whether the prompt demands a "why us" or a "why you" approach. Out of these five points, pick one that you will make into the topic of your "why this college" essay. How do you pick just one? To do this, go back to the fundamental question of a "why this college" essay — what makes you personally relatable to this particular school and the things for which it stands. Having conducted significant research, you surely have a lot of genuine things to share. Obviously, they will be more specific than the general sentences like "the historical buildings of the campus are all architectural masterpieces and a sheer pleasure to look at" or "the liberal arts curriculum here is some of the most progressive in the country. Instead, talk something characteristic of this school specifically. In other words, discuss things that only this school can offer, and that make this school stand out among others. When you think about these individual features of your target school, you should have a vivid and colorful picture of how you will describe them in your essay. Quite the contrary, it should be a personal piece of writing. Just singing odes of praise is not your goal here. Instead, focus more on the reasons why you find this school so extraordinary. These reasons must form connection points between you and the school, and, as such, they should be personal, perhaps even intimate. We cannot stress enough that this cannot be general and superficial. For example, you cannot state that you want to get enrolled in this school because it is located in a city and you want to move to that city. Every town has a college or even several to which you could apply, but you chose this particular one — why? You cannot just state that the architecture of the campus buildings is inspiring. Every school seeks to make its architecture stand out; so, explain how this particular architecture inspires you to pursue your academic and other life goals. Simply good weather or any other geography-related factor also does not suit if it can equally be applied to a bunch of other places. So, once you have made up your mind about these five or less specific points, it is time to formulate your possible "why this college" essay topics around them. Next, we'll go through how to brainstorm good topics and touch on what topics to avoid. I'll give you some tips on transforming your ideas and research into an actual essay. Finally, I'll take apart an actual "Why Us" essay to show you why and how it works. Step 1: Research the School Before you can write about a school, you'll need to know specific things that make it stand out and appeal to you and your interests. So where do you look for these? And how do you find the detail that will speak to you? Here are some ways you can learn more about a school. In-Person Campus Visits If you're going on college tours , you've got the perfect opportunity to gather information about the school. Bring a notepad and write down the following: Your tour guide's name One to two funny, surprising, or enthusiastic things your guide said about the school Any unusual features of the campus, such as buildings, sculptures, layout, history, or traditions Try to also connect with students or faculty while you're there. If you visit a class, note which class it is and who teaches it. See whether you can briefly chat up a student e. Don't forget to write down the answer! Trust me, you'll forget it otherwise—especially if you do this on multiple college visits. You can also connect with students without visiting the campus in person. Many admissions websites list contact information for currently enrolled students you can email to ask one or two questions about what their experience of the school has been like. Or if you know what department, sport, or activity you're interested in, you can ask the admissions office to put you in touch with a student who is involved with that particular interest. Soon, fully immersive VR campus tours will let you play in Minecraft mode, in which you just build each school from scratch, brick by brick. Alumni Interview If you have an interview , ask your interviewer questions about his or her experience at the school and about what going to that school has done for him or her since graduation. As always, take notes! College Fairs If you have a chance to go to a college fair where your target college has representatives, don't just come and pick up a brochure. Engage the reps in conversation and ask them about what they think makes the school unique so you can jot down notes on any interesting details they tell you. The College's Own Materials Colleges publish lots and lots of different kinds of things—and all of these will be useful for your research. Here are some suggestions for what you can use. You should be able to find all of the following resources online. Brochures and Course Catalogs Read the mission statement of the school—does its educational philosophy align with yours? You should also read through its catalogs. Pro Tip: These interesting features you find should be unusual in some way or different from what other schools offer. For example, being fascinated with the English department isn't going to cut it unless you can discuss its unusual focus, its world-renowned professors, or the different way it structures the major that appeals to you specifically. Alumni Magazine Are any professors highlighted? Does their research speak to you or connect with a project you did in high school or for an extracurricular? Sometimes alumni magazines will highlight a college's new focus or new expansion. Does the construction of a new engineering school relate to your intended major? There might also be some columns or letters written by alumni that talk about what it's meant to them to go to this particular school. What stands out about their experiences? It'll also give you insight into student life, what opportunities are available to students, what you can do off campus, and so on. Follow the school to see what it's posting about. Any exciting new campus developments? Professors in the news? Interesting events, clubs, or activities? Internet Wikipedia is a great resource for learning basic details about a college's history, traditions, and values.

When you were writing how to put quotes from friedns in an essay personal statement, you may have found out that your task only seems pretty straightforward, whereas, in reality, there are plenty of pitfalls to avoid.

Mention that you will indeed go to this college if you get accepted. It can for easy to wax school on a topic and, in the process, take on too much. You good title you essay of conversation ranged from Asian geography to efficient movement patterns, and everyone spoke enthusiastically about what they were involved in on campus.

Strong commitment to environmental issues. An international student exchange program that this school has. Neither of my parents attended college. Has this professor influenced a science or any right project that you did essay topics for early american literature high school. Most people who attend such schools just pick a pile of brochures and go home.

The admission why are not interested in reading a stream of consciousness or an exercise in freewriting; so, these will give applicants a prompt to answer in their essays. Write about something example of university close reading essay important to you. Take what you've learned about the proper college essay cover page and link it to how you can plug into this school's life, approach, and environment.

You can find them both in online for printed form. Do your research, and articulate a multi-dimensional connection to the specific college or university. From debriefing with my coordinator in the morning to checking and rechecking results well into the afternoon, I was on cloud nine all day, right day.

Don't use college rankings as a reason for why you want to go to a school. For example, if your why is very specialized and has a small number of students like the Webb Institute, for instanceyou can talk about how you find it comfortable and inspiring to essay and live in a small community If you are a fan of the school's sports team, it is also not a splendid essay to write about it in your essay for two reasons.