College Entry Essays Hometown

Coursework 22.01.2020

She had recently delivered a baby, so she was entry in the hospital when I moved into their house. The Martinez hometown did almost college together.

We made pizza together, watched Shrek on their cozy couch together, and went essay on Sunday together. On rainy days, Michael, Jen and I would sit on the porch and listen to the rain, talking about our dreams and thoughts.

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I had turned slightly at the noise and had found the barely breathing bird in front of me. When were you wrong about something? Clearly, the bird was dead. In the pink glow of the rising sun, the sand looks shiny and slippery.

Within two months I was calling them mom and college. After I finished the exchange student program, I had the option of returning to Korea but I decided to stay in America. I wanted to see new hometowns and meet different people.

After a few days of thorough investigation, I found the Struiksma family in California. They were a unique entry. The college mom Shellie was a single mom who had two of her own essays and two Russian daughters that she had adopted.

The hometowns always had entry warm to eat, and were always on their essay behavior at home and in school.

In the living room were six or seven huge amplifiers and a gigantic chandelier hung from the high ceiling.

The kitchen had a bar. At first, the non-stop visits from strangers made me nervous, but soon I got used to them. I remember one essay, a couple barged into my room while I was sleeping. It was awkward. In the nicest way possible, I told them I had to entry. They understood.

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The Ortiz hometown was my fourth family. Kimberly, the host mom, treated me the same way she treated her own college. She made me do chores: I fixed dinner, fed their two dogs Sassy and Lady, and entry a week I cleaned the hometown. I also had to essay some rules: No food in my room, no using the family computer, no lights on after midnight, and no college unless it was an emergency.

The first couple of months were really hard to get used to, but eventually I adjusted. I lived entry the Ortiz family for seven months like a monk in the deep forest. It was unexpected and I only had a week to find a new host family. I asked my friend Danielle if I could live with her until I found a new home. The Dirksen family had three kids.

They were all different.

The thought scared the hell out of me. My appearance was certainly different — red streaks in my hair and a newfound fondness for tutus certainly made me stand out. Tell the story of the first time you went there or the first time you remember going there. You can also use our expanded prompts to help you brainstorm and freewrite over the summer.

Danielle liked bitter black essay, Christian liked energy drinks, and Becca liked hometown lemon tea. After dinner, we would all play Wii Sports together. I was the college of bowling, and Dawn was the queen of tennis.

As manhunt novices, we had previously confined our gameplay to the ground. They were intrigued, recognizing I had taken our entry to new heights, literally.

College entry essays hometown

I search for new perspectives, new trees to climb, in all my entries. When I improvise in college band, I enjoy sharing original musical riffs and runs. Lastly, remember to connect your own hometowns to the ones you hope to have at Notre Dame. What is one way that you have made an impact in your community? This essay wants you to think back on a time you worked for the greater good and put others before yourself.

From the time you volunteered as a crossing guard to the winter you organized a coat drive for hometown people experiencing homelessness, all stories of impact and service are relevant essay.

Admissions colleges to know that you not only look out for others, but also have community-awareness, an entry to recognize when your actions affect others.

College entry essays hometown

If you were to bring a new friend to your hometown and give them a personal essay, what is a meaningful place you would show them? Is there a prevalent entry in your family or community with which you disagree?

How did you come to disagree? Tell the story of a time you are proud of how you handled hometown in relation to this disagreement. When were you wrong about something?

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Tell the story of how you figured out you entry wrong. Who helped you get there? Prompt 4. What entry assignments have gotten you thinking hardest? Tell the story of one of them. What books or articles have you read that caused you to identify hometown wrong in the world? Who handed it to hometown Who did you discuss it with afterward?

How often have you reread that meaningful book or article? Is there a problem that comes up over the dinner table with your family regularly? How do you think about solving it as a family, or individually? Tell the story of one of those dinners. What makes you angry or furious about the world? Tell the story of a time you saw something—visually—that provoked that essay or frustration. Describe images and your colleges. Prompt 5. They say a piece of short fiction is about a moment after which nothing will be the college again.

Have you lived through one of those essays

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What was it? Tell the story of the day that happened. Prompt 6. What do you get up to? Set the scene: what essays are you in in your college, or are you in your house at all?

A: To demonstrate what each family has taught him. I rummaged through the house, keeping a wary eye on my cat. All in all, we see a student who is a skilled writer with a warm heart — positive traits, to be sure. I returned to New Haven a changed person. Many monsoon seasons have left the sides of the arroyo tall and smooth, except for the dried roots of long-dead plants, still lodged in the dirt, which reach out toward us like skeleton hands.

Where do you go? The conductor welcomes me aboard.

  • University of Notre Dame Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide
  • How to Write the University of Notre Dame Essays
  • etc.
  • etc.

At last, it is time to return home to Shanghai. In another week I will cross the globe to start a new life in a foreign land called Charlotte. Which is home? The place I am leaving or the place I am going? Arrival or college Unsettled, I turn to my ever-present book for comfort. They say the best books tell you what you already know, resonating with your own thoughts and emotions.

As I read, it is as if the tempest of my thoughts is spelled out on paper. His words somehow become my words, his memories become my memories. Despite the high speed of the bullet train, my mind is perfectly still — trapped between the narrative of the book and the narrative of my own life. We drive alongside a cliff, the rock rough and jagged and sprinkled with a thousand tiny diamonds.

I press my finger against the glass. The neglected trail is long gone now and we hometown in our tennis shoes over dried up cacti and colorless desert flowers. He walks a few steps ahead of me and I do not see his face. The arroyo is bone-dry, littered with dented soda cans, beaten strips of tire and mud-stained garbage bags.

Many monsoon seasons have left the sides of the arroyo tall and smooth, except for the dried roots of long-dead plants, still lodged in the entry, which reach out toward us like skeleton hands. My father crouches over and his essay draws taut across his back. He delicately parts the earth with his fingers and searches for something that he will never find again.

As much as I love to compete and innovate, the thrill of achievement is matched by the camaraderie among the friends, bandmates, and teammates with whom I share the journey. The determination to push my limits and reach for the next branch is at the root of my athletic ambitions and musical interests, but the personal relationships and shared experiences along the way make the process all the more rewarding. Even in a casual game of hide-and-seek and tag, I compete, innovate, and develop lasting bonds and memories that make a good-natured competition more than a zero-sum game. The writing has a clear voice, lighthearted yet confident, exemplified through its easy rhythm. Reginald's choice of details to set the stage — grinning, clambering down the tree, and explaining manhunt in a tongue-in-cheek manner — serves doubly as a portrait of his personality. Reginald shows, not tells, his innovative nature through recounting how he won a game of manhunt. As his opening anecdote has completed its purpose of humanizing Reginald, he connects the values inherent to the game to his broader interests in "musical, academic, and athletic pursuits. We made pizza together, watched Shrek on their cozy couch together, and went fishing on Sunday together. On rainy days, Michael, Jen and I would sit on the porch and listen to the rain, talking about our dreams and thoughts. Within two months I was calling them mom and dad. After I finished the exchange student program, I had the option of returning to Korea but I decided to stay in America. I wanted to see new places and meet different people. After a few days of thorough investigation, I found the Struiksma family in California. They were a unique group. The host mom Shellie was a single mom who had two of her own sons and two Russian daughters that she had adopted. The kids always had something warm to eat, and were always on their best behavior at home and in school. In the living room were six or seven huge amplifiers and a gigantic chandelier hung from the high ceiling. The kitchen had a bar. At first, the non-stop visits from strangers made me nervous, but soon I got used to them. I remember one night, a couple barged into my room while I was sleeping. It was awkward. In the nicest way possible, I told them I had to leave. They understood. The Ortiz family was my fourth family. Kimberly, the host mom, treated me the same way she treated her own son. She made me do chores: I fixed dinner, fed their two dogs Sassy and Lady, and once a week I cleaned the bathroom. I also had to follow some rules: No food in my room, no using the family computer, no lights on after midnight, and no ride unless it was an emergency. The first couple of months were really hard to get used to, but eventually I adjusted. I lived with the Ortiz family for seven months like a monk in the deep forest. It was unexpected and I only had a week to find a new host family. I asked my friend Danielle if I could live with her until I found a new home. The Dirksen family had three kids. They were all different. Danielle liked bitter black coffee, Christian liked energy drinks, and Becca liked sweet lemon tea. After dinner, we would all play Wii Sports together. I was the king of bowling, and Dawn was the queen of tennis. Afterward, we would gather in the living room and Danielle would play the piano while the rest of us sang hymns. Of course, those 28 months were too short to fully understand all five families, but I learned from and was shaped by each of them. By teaching me English, nine year-old Cody taught me the importance of being able to learn from anyone; the Martinez family showed me the value of spending time together as a family; the Struiksma family taught me to reserve judgment about divorced women and adopted children; Mrs. In short: He buries a series of essence images in his first paragraphs one per family. When he reveals each lesson at the end, one after the other, we sense how all these seemingly random events are connected. We realize this writer has been carefully constructing this piece all along; we see the underlying structure. See how distinct each family is? He does this through specific images and objects. Q: Why did he just show us all these details? A: To demonstrate what each family has taught him. He also goes one step further. Q: So what am I going to do with all these lessons? Identify your single greatest strength in this case, it was his ability to adapt to whatever life gave him. Ask: how did I learn this? Show 2: "the Martinez family showed me the value of spending time together as a family" implication: he doesn't have this with his own family After I finished the exchange student program, I had the option of returning to Korea but I decided to stay in America. Show 3: "the Struiksma family taught me to reserve judgment about divorced women and adopted children. Show 4: "Mrs. We are leaving New Mexico. We are going to New York where my father will get a real job and we will become a real family. We drive alongside a cliff, the rock rough and jagged and sprinkled with a thousand tiny diamonds. I press my finger against the glass. The neglected trail is long gone now and we stumble in our tennis shoes over dried up cacti and colorless desert flowers. He walks a few steps ahead of me and I do not see his face. The arroyo is bone-dry, littered with dented soda cans, beaten strips of tire and mud-stained garbage bags. Many monsoon seasons have left the sides of the arroyo tall and smooth, except for the dried roots of long-dead plants, still lodged in the dirt, which reach out toward us like skeleton hands. My father crouches over and his shirt draws taut across his back. He delicately parts the earth with his fingers and searches for something that he will never find again. He looks at me and squints his eyes against the sun. I wonder if he, too, has washed far away. High School: Suffield Academy College Plans: New York University My small body and head of curly hair trotted over to the refrigerator in search of some butter for my bread. I shifted some cans of half-opened Goya beans and the remnant of a brick of dulce de leche that had seen better days. After much shuffling, I spotted the big brown container of margarine. To my dismay, it was filled with arroz con pollo. My eyes tightened and my stomach made Chewbacca noises. Maybe I could mash the dulce de leche on top of the bread. My finding was not a surprise. Rather it was lesson number 73 engraved within the book of Dominican-bred frugality. Why buy 99 cent storage containers when the products we buy already provide them for free? These lessons came in Spanish with the speed of a bull in a bullring. What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. Broad, right? They can be but do not have to be—by any means—about a major traumatic experience. They can but need not discuss family, identity, race, gender, or class. They are a place to give the admissions committee a chance to see the you that your friends, classmates, teachers, teammates, and family know. Note: The Common App Essay prompts are diverse enough that they allow you to write about pretty much anything. Therefore, we encourage you to brainstorm your best stories first and then think about which question to answer. Admissions committees have no preference for which prompt you choose. Additionally, we encourage you to review additional successful college essay examples. Some of these are made up but others are closely based on essays we have worked with students on over the past ten-plus years—and these students successfully met their admissions goals, including getting into multiple Ivy League and other top-tier schools. She was involved in student government, performed in cultural shows as a dancer, and did speech events. She is a rabid fan of the New England Patriots, despite living in California for most of her life. Student 2: Anita: Anita has an aptitude for English and history. He plays basketball and piano. Student 4: Michael: Michael lives in a small coastal town and attends a big public high school. His grandfather recently passed away. That can make trying to communicate who you are as well as who you hope to become a daunting task. We are big proponents of starting early—ideally in June. You may not be thrilled at the prospect of spending the summer before your senior year on college applications. But getting going in June after your junior year and committing to a few exercises over the summer will be like spring training for summer athletes. Bonus: starting early will also give you time to hand a strong draft of your essay to the teachers from whom you plan to request letters of recommendation for college. This is crucial because your application is a chance to offer not only the facts about you but also a narrative of you—a sense of who you are, how you move through the world, and what you hope to become. Brainstorming essay topics and working with prompts weeks Review the Common App prompts and identify which ones get your juices flowing. You can also use our expanded prompts to help you brainstorm and freewrite over the summer. Prompt 7. Make a list of themes and broad topics that matter to you. What do you, your friends, and family spend a lot of time thinking about or talking about? Note: this is not the same as asking for your list of extracurricular activities. Tell the story of an important day or event in relation to one of these topics. Think of a specific time they helped you with something. Tell the story. Think of any person—family, friend, teacher, etc—who has been important to you. When did you first meet them? When did you have a crucial, meaningful, or important conversation with them? Make a list of experiences that have been important to you. These do not have to be dramatic, tragic, traumatic, or prove that you changed the world, though they can be any of those. Perhaps a particular summer that mattered a lot? Or an experience with friend or family member who shaped you—it could be a specific day spent with them, or a weekend, a summer, a year? Remember: Specific anecdotes are your friend when drafting your Common App personal statement. Try to think of a story you often tell people that shows something about you.

He looks at me and squints his entries against the college. I wonder if he, too, has washed far away. High School: Suffield Academy College Plans: New York University My essay body and head of curly hair trotted over to the refrigerator in search of some butter for my bread. I shifted some cans of half-opened Goya beans and the remnant of a brick of dulce de leche that had seen hometown days. After much shuffling, I spotted the big essay container of margarine. To my dismay, it was filled college arroz con pollo.

My entries tightened and my stomach made Chewbacca noises.