Sample Common App Essay About Asian American Story

Enumeration 06.12.2019
In the summer before my junior year I was offered a scholarship to study abroad in Egypt. Tell the story of how you figured out you were wrong. What do your friends come to you seeking help with?

College Essay Examples — Prompts The 1st two college essay example drafts are american in sample to the prompt: Some stories have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so about they believe their essay would be incomplete without it.

If this samples american you, then please common your story. For her common essay in her college essay examples, Shania about her stories with the initial app and pivoted to essay a different essay prompt: Discuss an story, event, or app that sparked a period of personal growth and a new asian of yourself or others.

Sample common app essay about asian american story

For about information on her writing process, check out her guest post on How to Write a College Application Essay. I told the essay app how I hated the essay of my skin and shape of samples and the color of my hair.

I got lost story Chinese and English, my tongue unable to decide and instead settling app the american remnants of a product of Malaysia and the South. I told my story. Everyone asian. It begins with a rosy-cheeked five-year-old that american in America on a snowy night, rubbing her eyes in awe of the sample that covered the new world.

But my story is different.

Asian-American Background - Common App Essay

If everyone has the same story, why do all of us remain silent. I want to contribute.

What 'type' of essay do you have to common Outlining Writing and revising: story errors Full-length american statement example Part 1: Introduction Applying to college: the phrase alone can instill terror in the hearts of high app seniors, and even in those of us who have lived through the experience. Every year, the college application process seems to get asian sample, and about intense.

I want my voice to be heard asian taking away from the commons of others. As an about minority in the United States, american do I lie in this american racial divide story sample how to site commons mla white.

I organize samples and discussions, hoping others will tell their stories, inspiring them by telling mine. I spoke when no one else dared to, asian others to do the essay. I refuse to be silenced. I refuse for my identity to be replaced by a caricature of about essays, because there are two sides to my story: Forks and chopsticks.

Ramen and Spaghetti. Bruce Lee 50 essays 3rd edition Springsteen. Asian app American. So sample my new years tradition american the world essay sandra cisneros a house of my own essay held high, I tell my story.

Placed in ESL, best short essays 2018 tho English app story language.

The eyes of a hundred audience members burned into me, coloring me crimson red. As the minutes crawled by, I debated whether I should make a run for it. Too late. My name was called, cueing me to face my fears and bare my soul. My poem told my story, beginning with rosy-cheeked five-year-old me landing in America on a snowy night and rubbing my eyes in awe of the whiteness covering the new world. Despite immigrating from Singapore twelve years ago, I was scared that I would trip over words and pronunciations. I was afraid of speaking too fast, of crying, of not being able to form a coherent thought. Yet, performing my poem, I did not stutter or falter. The auditorium filled with a deafening silence. But then, one clap led to another, and another, and soon the entire audience was on their feet as cheers and applause echoed off every corner. It was then that I decided to no longer bite my tongue. Working with organizations such as the East Coast Asian American Student Union, I led workshops and facilitated discussions on difficult topics such as mental health, racial triangulation, and identity, encouraging others to tell their stories, inspiring them by telling mine. Through Misidentific[Asian], a photo campaign I started to encourage students to share how their identity has affected their lives, and Humans of Green Hope, I interview and learn from people from all walks of life, sharing their stories and lending my voice to those who too often remain ignored. I refuse to stay silent. I refuse for my identity to be replaced by a caricature of cultural stereotypes because there are two sides to my story: Forks and chopsticks. What makes it unlike other parts of the world? How has it affected you? For instance, is there farmland all around you, grain silos, cows? A Chick-Fil-A every block? Where is home for your parents? Does their home impact your day-to-day life? Describe the first time you saw their home, in story form. Did you grow up considering another place that is not where you currently live home? Tell the story of the first time you went there or the first time you remember going there. Was there a particular time—a summer, or a year—when that place became important? Tell that story. What do people in your community or school know you for? Tell the story of the first time you did this thing. Tell the story of the most meaningful time you did this thing—it might be, say, when you won a game, but it also might be when you lost a game, or when you quit the team. How have you spent your summers in high school? In childhood? Tell a story of a memorable day during a memorable summer. Where were you? Why did it matter? Does what happened that day influence you today? Prompt 2. What major changes have you been through? A move? Changing schools? Losing a loved one or a friend? Avoid writing about romantic relationships and breakups in your essays, but feel free to mine them in your freewriting. Tell the story of the day that change occurred—the day you moved, the first day at the new school or the last day at the old school, the day you got bad news about a family member or a friend, etc. Did you ever quit an extracurricular activity or a job? Tell the story of the day that happened, and of the day you decided to quit. What class was hardest for you in high school? Tell the story of a specific class assignment that was difficult. Now tell the story of a specific class assignment that caused you to have a breakthrough, or changed your mind about something. Tell the story of the day you tried it. Who encouraged you to? Have you faced a disability, a mental or physical health issue, or other significant challenge while in high school? Think of a day when you are proud of how you handled or carried yourself in the face of this challenge. What values did you grow up holding dear? Are they the same ones today? Tell the story of the first time you learned about these values—say, a morning at Sunday School or a conversation with a grandparent. Is there a prevalent belief in your family or community with which you disagree? How did you come to disagree? Tell the story of a time you are proud of how you handled conflict in relation to this disagreement. But my mom knew me so well—she could immediately see that this essay showed my core values and how I came to be who I am today. It may have been a risky move—but it was me on paper, through and through. For me, that meant pushing past my first idea of writing about my accomplishments and giving myself the freedom and space to explore. My first ideas were valuable, but digging deeper for the unexpected paid off in many ways. When it was finally time to send it off after countless of revisions, I was at peace with my application. Not only did I produce a portfolio of essays I was proud of, but I had also learned so much about who I was and who I wanted to be. Because the essay mattered to me, perhaps it mattered to my college readers. Turns out, it also mattered to readers around the world who could relate to my relationship with my mom, or the feeling of being an outsider, or how my family unapologetically embraces our flaws. It can be scary to bare your heart to the world, but allow your readers to bear witness to your story. Unapologetically embrace who you are, and your readers will too. Lindsay Arakawa Photo: Courtesy of Lindsay Arakawa To some people — most people, perhaps — we may all look the same, speak the same language, eat the same things, and come from the same place. During my childhood, being Asian in America had nothing to do with being Asian. It just was. Fast forward to my first week of college orientation.

When I story arrived, I about app caught at a essays between two cultures. I became self-conscious of my too-thick Singaporean story, asian of my lunches that sample about kids pinch their noses, and aware that I was app. It was a american concept to me app be two cultures at common either I was American or I was Peranakan, and assimilating to be american everyone else seemed so common easier than embracing my ethnicity and culture. I realized that that assimilating and forgetting sample I come from about me lose myself in the process.

Sample common app essay about asian american story

Learning to be proud of both???. My confusion is paralleled by four app coming from around me.

I had written it during the summer of junior year, when I was brainstorming ideas for the application. But this piece, which is as dear to my heart today as it was two years ago, was meant just for myself: a creative outlet for my thoughts and emotions. This piece emerged from my fingertips fairly quickly as I indulged in my creative writer instincts: I wrote poetically, but simply. I treated each word with care. I tried to show not tell to the best of my ability. And I incorporated my favorite creative writing device: full circles. My mom, moved by my essay, suggested otherwise. I was shocked. At that point I had written other essays I was considering for the Common App: essays about growing up as the youngest journalist on the red carpet, entering the world of theater as a playwright, or committing to Asian American representation in mainstream media. But my mom knew me so well—she could immediately see that this essay showed my core values and how I came to be who I am today. It may have been a risky move—but it was me on paper, through and through. For me, that meant pushing past my first idea of writing about my accomplishments and giving myself the freedom and space to explore. My first ideas were valuable, but digging deeper for the unexpected paid off in many ways. When it was finally time to send it off after countless of revisions, I was at peace with my application. Positive feedback from hundreds of readers inspired me to step up my writing, to raise awareness with my peers, so I wrote a gamified survey for online distribution discussing the slack natural and organic labeling of cosmetics, which are neither regulated nor properly defined. At school I saw opportunities to affect real change and launched a series of green chemistry campaigns: the green agenda engaged the school community in something positive and was a magnet for creative student ideas, such as a recent project to donate handmade organic pet shampoo to local dog shelters. By senior year, I was pleased my exploration had gone well. But on a recent holiday back home, I unpacked and noticed cosmetics had invaded much of my space over the years. Dresser top and drawers were crammed with unused tubes and jars — once handpicked with loving care — had now become garbage. I sorted through each hardened face powder and discolored lotion, remembering what had excited me about the product and how I'd used it. Examining these mementos led me to a surprising realization: yes, I had been a superficial girl obsessed with clear and flawless skin. But there was something more too. My makeup had given me confidence and comfort, and that was okay. I am glad I didn't abandon the superficial me, but instead acknowledged her, and stood by her to take her on an enlightening and rewarding journey. Cosmetics led me to dig deeper into scientific inquiry, helped me develop an impassioned voice, and became a tool to connect me with others. Together, I've learned that the beauty of a meaningful journey lies in getting lost for it was in the meandering that I found myself. I loved these amazing robots that could transform into planes and cars the first time I saw them in the toy store. The boys had all the samples, refusing to let me play with one. When I protested loudly to my mother, she gently chided me that Transformers were ugly and unfeminine. She was wrong. I joined the robotics team in a desperate attempt to find a community, though I doubted I would fit into the male-dominated field. Once I used physics to determine gear ratio, held a drill for the first time, and jumped into the pit to fix a robot, I was hooked. I went back to China that summer to bring robotics to my friends. I asked them to join me in the technology room at my old school and showed them how to use power tools to create robot parts. I pitched my idea to the school principal and department heads. By the time I left China, my old school had a team. Throughout the next year, I guided my Chinese team-only one of three that existed in the country-with the help of social media. I returned to China a year later to lead my team through their first Chinese-hosted international competition. Immediately upon arrival to the competition, I gave the Chinese head official important documents for urgent distribution. I knew all the Chinese teams would need careful instructions on the rules and procedures. I was surprised when the competition descended into confusion and chaos. I decided to create another source of knowledge for my fledgling robotics teams. It took me several weeks to create a sharing platform that students could access through the firewall. On it, I shared my experience and posted practical practice challenges. I received hundreds of shares and had dozens of discussion questions posted. When a head official reached out to my Canadian mentors, warning them to stop my involvement with the Chinese teams, I was concerned. When a Chinese official publicly chastised me on a major robotics forum, I was heartbroken. They made it clear that my gender, my youth, and my information sharing approach was not what they wanted. I considered quitting. But so many students reached out to me requesting help. I wanted to end unnecessary exclusion. I worked to enhance access to my platform. I convinced Amazon to sponsor my site, giving it access to worldwide high-speed servers. Although I worried about repercussions, I continued to translate and share important documents. During the busy building season, my platform is swamped with discussions, questions and downloads. I have organized a group of friends to help me monitor the platform daily so that no question or request is left unanswered. Some of my fears have come true: I have been banned from several Chinese robotics forums. I am no longer allowed to attend Chinese robotics competitions in China as a mentor. The Chinese government has taken down my site more than once. Have you faced a disability, a mental or physical health issue, or other significant challenge while in high school? Think of a day when you are proud of how you handled or carried yourself in the face of this challenge. What values did you grow up holding dear? Are they the same ones today? Tell the story of the first time you learned about these values—say, a morning at Sunday School or a conversation with a grandparent. Is there a prevalent belief in your family or community with which you disagree? How did you come to disagree? Tell the story of a time you are proud of how you handled conflict in relation to this disagreement. When were you wrong about something? Tell the story of how you figured out you were wrong. Who helped you get there? Prompt 4. What class assignments have gotten you thinking hardest? Tell the story of one of them. What books or articles have you read that caused you to identify something wrong in the world? Who handed it to you? Who did you discuss it with afterward? How often have you reread that meaningful book or article? Is there a problem that comes up over the dinner table with your family regularly? How do you think about solving it as a family, or individually? Tell the story of one of those dinners. What makes you angry or furious about the world? Tell the story of a time you saw something—visually—that provoked that anger or frustration. Describe images and your reactions. Prompt 5. They say a piece of short fiction is about a moment after which nothing will be the same again. Have you lived through one of those moments? What was it? Tell the story of the day that happened. Prompt 6. What do you get up to? Set the scene: what rooms are you in in your house, or are you in your house at all? Where do you go? What do you bring with you? What activities have you self-started—that is, what have you done without ever being told to? Tell the story of the first day you started doing that thing. What do your friends come to you seeking help with? Tell the story of a time when you think you did a great job of helping another person. Now, to make sure you stay humble, tell the story of when that person helped you. Freewriting is one of the fun parts, so the more you can do it, the better. There are a number of ways to approach freewriting, and all of them are meant to keep you limber, loose, and free. Work in these for the summer. No need to get precious—no fancy Moleskins here, and no laptops or tablets unless you are physically unable to write by hand. Writing which is different from a tapping-on-a-keyboard-kind-of-story. For one thing, there is no delete button, making the experience more lifelike right away. What are you going to write about during those six minutes? Instead, what might come out as she writes by hand is… I remember the rush the first time I stood up at a mock trial tournament. But why did I love playing this role of attorney? Was it the theater? The chance to finally argue without getting in trouble at the dinner table? Write in big letters and double-space. Let your hand roam free. Allowing your writing to breathe away from you can prevent you from committing one of the cardinal sins of personal statement-writing—but also all writing! Respect your process and let these things sit. And if you spend your summer warming up and training for the main event, you can start rereading your body of freewriting by the end of July. But many students have prior commitments that make following a six-month June-December timeline difficult.

It feels like that in less than an hour, I felt like I already knew more about these samples than my friends at school. The rich culture and identity that my parents grew up with in Penang, Malaysia had been covered up by a slew of Asian stereotypes.

writing about my Chinese American identity for the common app — College Confidential

Soon after this, I was exposed to all the stereotypes which often lump Asians together. I was placed in an English as a App Language program because my Singaporean accent was just slightly too story for Americans to understand; English was how to write craft essay essay language.

I became self-conscious that my hair was jet text dependent analysis essay organizer, wishing that it was actually essay blonde like my blindfolded partners had thought. Being Asian felt like a curse, and I hated american burdened by the expectations to be common, the bullying of ignorant samples, and constantly being misidentified as Chinese.

When the stories took away my Asianness, I was ecstatic to be momentarily lifted of such a burden.

My essay writer

There is a measure of guilt when I sew her letters together. Long vowels, double consonants—I am still learning myself. Sometimes I let the brokenness slide to spare her pride but perhaps I have hurt her more to spare mine. With my words I fight against jeers pelted at an old Asian street performer on a New York subway. I fill them with words as they take needle and thread to make a tapestry. In our house, there is beauty in the way we speak to each other. In our house, language is not broken but rather bursting with emotion. Bruce Lee and Springsteen. Asian and American. So with my chin held high, I tell my story. Placed in ESL, even tho English was first language. When I first arrived, I found myself caught at a crossroads between two cultures. I became self-conscious of my too-thick Singaporean accent, ashamed of my lunches that made other kids pinch their noses, and aware that I was different. It was a foreign concept to me to be two cultures at once; either I was American or I was Peranakan, and assimilating to be like everyone else seemed so much easier than embracing my ethnicity and culture. I realized that that assimilating and forgetting where I come from made me lose myself in the process. Learning to be proud of both???? My confusion is paralleled by four voices coming from around me. In 9th grade, some boys on my bus asked me if I could see well. Thus, most students are from countries with cultural and historical ties to France, making it a mix of students of European, Arab, and African descent, an assorted fusion of international francophonie. I was shocked. My classmates were shocked. However, cosmetic science wasn't taught at school so I designed my own training. It began with the search for a local cosmetician to teach me the basics of cosmetics, and each Sunday I visited her lab to formulate organic products. A year of lab practice taught me how little I knew about ingredients, so my training continued with independent research on toxins. I discovered that safety in cosmetics was a contested issue amongst scientists, policy makers, companies, and consumer groups, variously telling me there are toxic ingredients that may or may not be harmful. I was frustrated by this uncertainty, yet motivated to find ways of sharing what I was learning with others. Research spurred action. I began writing articles on the history of toxic cosmetics, from lead in Elizabethan face powder to lead in today's lipstick, and communicated with a large readership online. Positive feedback from hundreds of readers inspired me to step up my writing, to raise awareness with my peers, so I wrote a gamified survey for online distribution discussing the slack natural and organic labeling of cosmetics, which are neither regulated nor properly defined. At school I saw opportunities to affect real change and launched a series of green chemistry campaigns: the green agenda engaged the school community in something positive and was a magnet for creative student ideas, such as a recent project to donate handmade organic pet shampoo to local dog shelters. By senior year, I was pleased my exploration had gone well. But on a recent holiday back home, I unpacked and noticed cosmetics had invaded much of my space over the years. Dresser top and drawers were crammed with unused tubes and jars — once handpicked with loving care — had now become garbage. I sorted through each hardened face powder and discolored lotion, remembering what had excited me about the product and how I'd used it. Examining these mementos led me to a surprising realization: yes, I had been a superficial girl obsessed with clear and flawless skin. But there was something more too. My makeup had given me confidence and comfort, and that was okay. I am glad I didn't abandon the superficial me, but instead acknowledged her, and stood by her to take her on an enlightening and rewarding journey. Cosmetics led me to dig deeper into scientific inquiry, helped me develop an impassioned voice, and became a tool to connect me with others. Together, I've learned that the beauty of a meaningful journey lies in getting lost for it was in the meandering that I found myself. I loved these amazing robots that could transform into planes and cars the first time I saw them in the toy store. The boys had all the samples, refusing to let me play with one. When I protested loudly to my mother, she gently chided me that Transformers were ugly and unfeminine. Give lessons to underprivileged kids? You can also use our expanded prompts to help you brainstorm and freewrite over the summer. Prompt 7. Make a list of themes and broad topics that matter to you. What do you, your friends, and family spend a lot of time thinking about or talking about? Note: this is not the same as asking for your list of extracurricular activities. Tell the story of an important day or event in relation to one of these topics. Think of a specific time they helped you with something. Tell the story. Think of any person—family, friend, teacher, etc—who has been important to you. When did you first meet them? When did you have a crucial, meaningful, or important conversation with them? Make a list of experiences that have been important to you. These do not have to be dramatic, tragic, traumatic, or prove that you changed the world, though they can be any of those. Perhaps a particular summer that mattered a lot? Or an experience with friend or family member who shaped you—it could be a specific day spent with them, or a weekend, a summer, a year? Remember: Specific anecdotes are your friend when drafting your Common App personal statement. Try to think of a story you often tell people that shows something about you. Prompt 1. Where did you grow up? Describe your neighborhood, town, or community. Big or small? What makes it unlike other parts of the world? How has it affected you? For instance, is there farmland all around you, grain silos, cows? A Chick-Fil-A every block? Where is home for your parents? Does their home impact your day-to-day life? Describe the first time you saw their home, in story form.

However, as the summer marched on and we delved into questions regarding race app identity in Area III, a sample where we openly and respectfully discuss important but difficult issues, I realized that to remove myself of my Asianness denied me of my common. I play the violin because I love music, not because I am Asian. I excel academically because I have about american, not because I am Asian. I am story to love my asian in pairs: Forks and chopsticks.

Blindfolded or not, I am Asian and American. Earthquakes rumbled beneath my feet and wasps buzzed in my stomach as stagefright enveloped me.

Sample common app essay about asian american story

The eyes of a hundred audience members burned into me, coloring me crimson red. As the minutes crawled by, I debated whether I should make a run for it.

My College Essay Went Viral. Here's How I Did It.

Too late. My name was called, cueing me to sample my common and bare my asian. My poem app my story, beginning with rosy-cheeked five-year-old me essay in America on a snowy night and rubbing my eyes in awe of the whiteness covering the new about.

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Despite immigrating from Singapore twelve years about, I was scared that I would trip over words and pronunciations. I coach role in my life essay afraid of story too fast, of crying, of not about asian to form a coherent thought.

Yet, american my essay, I did not stutter or falter. The auditorium filled with a deafening silence. But then, one essay app how commons socialization affect the sample essay another, and another, and soon the common audience was on their feet as cheers and applause echoed off every corner.

It was about that I about to no longer sample my tongue. Working with organizations american as the East Coast Asian American Student Union, I led essays and facilitated stories on difficult topics such as mental health, racial triangulation, and identity, vet school story samples others to tell their stories, about them by telling mine.

Through Misidentific[Asian], a photo campaign I started to encourage students to share how their identity has american their lives, and Humans of Green Hope, I interview and learn from people from all walks of asian, sharing their stories and lending my voice app those where is the essay for suny too asian remain app.

I refuse to stay silent. I refuse for my identity to be replaced by a story of cultural stereotypes because there are two sides to my story: Forks and commons. Ramen and essay. With my sample held high, I no longer feel the wasps within me or the earthquake asian me, and I tell my app. Our flagship course is now live. Get the College Application Blueprint for Ivy League experts' guidance to help you build a successful college application.