Positionality Essays Examples Ohio State

Enumeration 05.12.2019

Writing the thesis

This is the potential for over-identification with the researcher, where as a result the participants tell the researcher intimate details of their lives because they believe their experiences to be the same, an openness which they may later come to regret Finch Clearly from what Broun says here, some participants did hold back from telling her about all aspects of their lives. However, I remain concerned that the paper does not discuss the use of research strategies such as giving the women their interview transcripts back to check, or offering them power of veto over inclusion of their data in the final research report, which would have shown that safeguards had been put in place to help lessen her power over them. Broun's motivation for her research of showing disabled women as resilient, strong and capable is admirable, but I would have liked to have seen more analysis of the effects of participation on the other women, especially given the profound impact the research has had on her own life. Instead there is an apparent assumption in the paper that, because the women had previously been involved in other research projects, taking part in this research had not affected them in any way. This may indeed have been the case, but the paper does not discuss any follow-up conversations with them, or tell us what the women thought about having their stories told. The need for such an analysis appears particularly relevant given the focus in the final section of the paper on the need to recognise the relationship between - and reciprocal mutual construction of - self and other in the research process. Surely if Broun's sense of herself was changed through her contact with these women, so too their own self-perceptions must have been altered in some way by the experience. And what, if anything, did they get out of the research? These are uncomfortable questions that may challenge our assumed right as researchers to keep control of the research process, especially given that often it is we as researchers who are the main beneficiaries of the work we do. But I think they are the sort of questions we need to keep asking ourselves if our research is to truly reflect the reality of our inter-dependence with research participants. Dilemmas for disabled researchers The middle part of the paper discusses with great courage and honesty the profound impact that conducting the research has had on Broun's self-image and self-esteem. In reading her account, I doubt that I was alone in recognising some difficult issues from my own history of trying to come to terms with the whole of who I am. Although her focus is on her struggle to acknowledge and own her impairment, I suspect that her story will also ring true with non-disabled researchers who are engaged in work that is similarly deeply personally involving. However, as Mac and Ghaill has previously stated, such stories of personal struggle for researchers often tend to remain within our research diaries, or are only published once our main research findings have been safely published and accepted. In this context, Broun's paper is extremely important in bringing out into the open some of these deeply personal issues that affect how we conduct our research, and how that work impacts on our lives as a whole. She herself puts it beautifully: "I had no idea that, through the study, I would be forced to see myself in the mirror of reality". My heart went out to her as I read her description of the internalised oppression that had previously prevented her being able to embrace the totality of her self, and that had led her to spend so much time and energy protecting other people from her difference. I wanted to say to her — "Sister, let them worry. You've got better things to do with your time". And it looks from what she says as if some years on she has become increasingly able to let go of those constraints, and to spend more energy looking after herself. But I also think, if my own experience is anything to go by, that the assimilation process she discusses here is probably always ongoing, and that we never fully connect with everything we are at once. I can also understand something of the difficulty she found in not being able to ask the other women questions which she herself would have found personally intrusive. This is especially important in postconflict through focus groups and one-on-one interviews in Uganda. They societies, where researchers can humanize the process, respect refused to be recognized for their personal and professional reasons local partners, and accept failure when it happens. It is impor- which I respect. However, my first instinct was to make them visible tant for researchers to follow through and send along their given the transparency that is important and required of us when we findings as they promise in documents for ethics clearance. Thank you to Funmi Olonesakin and Godwin Some of the options available to researchers include offering Murunga, Shuvai Nyoni for initial funding of this project through the trainings that decolonize methodologies and offer antiracist Africa Leadership Centre. Koen Vlassenroot and An Ansoms sup- and anti-oppressive trainings to both senior and junior ported application to Fonds Voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek researchers before and after fieldwork, although this decoloniz- FWO for additional funding to complete this project. Such trainings might be offered as part of the lier drafts that strengthened the quality of this article. I am grateful to ongoing support from professional organizations but should participants of the silent voices workshop especially Arthur Owor, also be part of graduate training. Steven Schoofs, and Emmanuel Akampurira where I shared ideas from this article and received constructive feedback. Thank you to the anonymous reviewers for providing critical feedback that has strengthened this article. Conclusion This article has highlighted three areas of concern for research Declaration of Conflicting Interests associates and respondents who have participated in the pro- duction of knowledge in Northern Uganda. Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek FWO. New York, NY: Routledge. Cramer, C. Research note: Mistakes, crises, and research independence: The perils of field- References work as a form of evidence. African Affairs, , — Allen, T. Cresswell, J. Research design: Quali- Vlassenroot Eds. Thousand reconciliation in Northern Uganda. School of Economics and Political Science. Cronin-Furman, K. Ethics abroad: Fieldwork in Bah, A. The contours of new humanitarianism: War and fragile and violent contexts. Africa Today, 60, 3— Baines, E. What is our research for? Responsibility, human- refugee crisis. London, England: Ashgate. Africa Spec- Behrend, H. Alice Lakwena and the Holy Spirits: War in trum, 54, 4— Northern Uganda, — Athens: Ohio University Press. De Laine, M. Fieldwork, participation and practice ethics and Beoku-Betts, J. When black is not enough: Doing field dilemmas in qualitative research. London, England: Sage. NWSA Journal, 6, — Dolan, C. Validity and reliability issues in elite interview- Vol. Dunn, L. Improving informed consent and Boddy, J. The research ethics guidebook: A resource behavior. Journal of the American Medical Association, , for social scientists. Responsible scholarship after leaving the veranda: Bouka, Y. Thomson tists. International Political Sociology, 2, — London, England: Palgrave. The Professional Geographer, 71, Bouka, Y. Collaborative research as structural vio- 75— Political Violence at a Glance. Peace and conflict studies research: calviolenceataglance. Charlotte, NC: Information Age. Living with bad surroundings: War, history, and Branch, A. Neither peace nor justice: Political violence and everyday moments in Northern Uganda. African Studies versity Press. Quarterly, 8, 2— Displacing human rights: War and intervention in magic of occult economies. Africa Spectrum, 47, — Northern Uganda. Fisher, J. Structure, agency and Africa in the international Branch, A. Gulu in war. The town as camp in system: Donor diplomacy and regional security policy in East Northern Uganda. Urban Studies, 50, — Africa since the s. Conflict, Security and Development, 13, Branch, A. Decolonizing the African Studies centre. The Cam- — Fujii, L. Research ethics Delimmas and responsibil- Briggs, R. Gender and location in African ities. African Ginyara, P. Is there a Northern Question? Kumar Affairs, , — Rethinking reconciliation: Concepts, methods Peace Research Institute. The theory, practice, and evaluation of the phenom- ing in Rwanda PhD thesis. Uppsala University, Uppsala, enological method as a qualitative research procedure. Journal of Sweden. Phenomenological Psychology, 28, — Humanitarian presence and Gobo, G. Back to Likert. Towards a conversational survey. Vogt Eds. Disasters, 34, S—S London, England: Chan, Z. Bracketing in Sage. Payment of clinical research subjects. The Journal ysis process, The Qualitative Report, 18, 1—9. Clark, J. Fieldwork in the global South: Ethical challenges Gupta, A. Authorship, research assistants and the ethnographic and dilemmas. Ethnography, 15, — Mwambari 11 Hannerz, U. Foreign news: Exploring the world of foreign Middleton, T. Coming to terms: Reinserting correspondents. Ethnogra- Hesse-Biber, S. While other oral history compendia, digital collections and finding aids exist, the DALN is unique in its expansiveness over distinct narratives to date , sustainable sponsorship The Ohio State University and Georgia State University , and potential for comprehensive applicability within interdisciplinary classroom pedagogy. This volume surpasses expectations by touching on salient issues in rhetoric and composition: storytelling, globalization, digital composition, building a vertical writing curriculum, allowing research subjects their own voices, literacy sponsorship, research methods, performance, and so on. Yet, this collection offers so much more. As a researcher with a long-time interest in archival research methods, I am struck by essays that focus on larger issues facing humanities scholars, pieces that highlight ways in which the DALN can mentor, encourage a sense of serendipity in primary research, foster student publishing, and ultimately bring archival research to life by offering beginning scholars ways to understand issues of positionality through embodied illustrations of how one might ethically connect academic work and personal interests. I like to get my hands dirty, bury myself in the bowels sometimes literally of special collections holdings, open boxes while wearing cotton gloves, peer at marginalia, hold my breath as I view fragile works bolstered by foam supports. However, the time comes, even for the most traditional of archival scholars, when one must organize findings whether physical or digital by creating a template for making sense of ephemera and artifacts. In Working in the Archives, Nan Johnson describes her methods for organizing her archival collection of 19th-Century materials in the literal shape of a wheel, one where she can physically rearrange and manipulate the spokes in her living room as her research questions shift. Within the four primary subdivisions, I applaud the guiding questions designed to help negotiate the contributions. Throughout the text, readers find ways to blend qualitative and quantitative methods of inquiry, integrate primary and secondary research findings, and write personal narratives to explore researcher perspectives. For example, people usually tend to judge someone that is of a different color than white, so that helps me to achieve higher privilege. For example, she says that being white allows them to have different privileges than blacks. This could mean not getting harassed by cops, or simply could mean your race will be shown widely. Me being a male is another trait that allows me to posses privilege.

I have been put into example categories that shape the way I am looked at. Some of the stereotypes that are connected with the categories essay photo one word essay beauty privilege over other groups, state some carry essay connotations along with them.

Positionality essays examples ohio state

These essays not only can example people example, but state influence the way people think and also affect their own viewpoint.

I am a white example class ohio who understands the messed up essay we are in and how the different categories you fall into either grant you privilege or oppression. I am a business major and there are always examples that go with along with the state categories.

Positionality essays examples ohio state

Middle class. These are a few of the traits, or categories, that affect my place and privilege in society.

It is therefore not These issues include and after fieldwork. Finally, there is a critical question of reflection for ethical Finally, in this study, research associates alluded to the fact clearance bodies concerned with these matters in war and post- that sometimes outsiders ask tough and rude or culturally insen- conflict contexts. It can be very easy to access research permits sitive questions that cannot be translated. In such cases, if an and not follow through with any protocols given the context of assistant informs the researcher that the question cannot be fragile states. However, some researchers also complain that in asked, it is good not to push the assistant but to paraphrase the some countries such as Ethiopia and Rwanda, local research question or abandon it altogether. Thus, a risk assessment must clearance is restricted and can result in a researcher being be continuous from the beginning and included after fieldwork followed and later protesting such government surveillance. While there have been some posi- The question local authorities must ask is how they regulate tive steps in ensuring that colonial tendencies are kept to a this industry that presents challenges and opportunities to minimum in the research process, there is still a high level of research associates in a way that both protects important elitism and patronage in how researchers exercise their power knowledge from being co-opted from future generations and over their local partners or interlocutors. Many outsiders who constructively interrogates how such regulations affect the come to the field lack the humility, patience, and wisdom research associates who benefit from the current disorganiza- required when interacting with a new cultural context and com- tion of the industry. These concerns require robust engagement ing to collect data. This is especially important in postconflict through focus groups and one-on-one interviews in Uganda. They societies, where researchers can humanize the process, respect refused to be recognized for their personal and professional reasons local partners, and accept failure when it happens. It is impor- which I respect. However, my first instinct was to make them visible tant for researchers to follow through and send along their given the transparency that is important and required of us when we findings as they promise in documents for ethics clearance. Thank you to Funmi Olonesakin and Godwin Some of the options available to researchers include offering Murunga, Shuvai Nyoni for initial funding of this project through the trainings that decolonize methodologies and offer antiracist Africa Leadership Centre. Koen Vlassenroot and An Ansoms sup- and anti-oppressive trainings to both senior and junior ported application to Fonds Voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek researchers before and after fieldwork, although this decoloniz- FWO for additional funding to complete this project. Such trainings might be offered as part of the lier drafts that strengthened the quality of this article. I am grateful to ongoing support from professional organizations but should participants of the silent voices workshop especially Arthur Owor, also be part of graduate training. Steven Schoofs, and Emmanuel Akampurira where I shared ideas from this article and received constructive feedback. Thank you to the anonymous reviewers for providing critical feedback that has strengthened this article. Conclusion This article has highlighted three areas of concern for research Declaration of Conflicting Interests associates and respondents who have participated in the pro- duction of knowledge in Northern Uganda. Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek FWO. New York, NY: Routledge. Cramer, C. Research note: Mistakes, crises, and research independence: The perils of field- References work as a form of evidence. African Affairs, , — Allen, T. Cresswell, J. Research design: Quali- Vlassenroot Eds. Thousand reconciliation in Northern Uganda. School of Economics and Political Science. Cronin-Furman, K. Ethics abroad: Fieldwork in Bah, A. The contours of new humanitarianism: War and fragile and violent contexts. Africa Today, 60, 3— Baines, E. What is our research for? Responsibility, human- refugee crisis. London, England: Ashgate. Africa Spec- Behrend, H. Alice Lakwena and the Holy Spirits: War in trum, 54, 4— Northern Uganda, — Athens: Ohio University Press. De Laine, M. Fieldwork, participation and practice ethics and Beoku-Betts, J. When black is not enough: Doing field dilemmas in qualitative research. London, England: Sage. NWSA Journal, 6, — Dolan, C. Validity and reliability issues in elite interview- Vol. Dunn, L. Improving informed consent and Boddy, J. The research ethics guidebook: A resource behavior. Journal of the American Medical Association, , for social scientists. Responsible scholarship after leaving the veranda: Bouka, Y. Thomson tists. International Political Sociology, 2, — London, England: Palgrave. The Professional Geographer, 71, Bouka, Y. Collaborative research as structural vio- 75— Political Violence at a Glance. Peace and conflict studies research: calviolenceataglance. Charlotte, NC: Information Age. Living with bad surroundings: War, history, and Branch, A. Neither peace nor justice: Political violence and everyday moments in Northern Uganda. African Studies versity Press. Quarterly, 8, 2— Displacing human rights: War and intervention in magic of occult economies. Africa Spectrum, 47, — Northern Uganda. Fisher, J. Structure, agency and Africa in the international Branch, A. Gulu in war. The town as camp in system: Donor diplomacy and regional security policy in East Northern Uganda. Urban Studies, 50, — Africa since the s. Conflict, Security and Development, 13, Branch, A. Decolonizing the African Studies centre. The Cam- — Fujii, L. Research ethics Delimmas and responsibil- Briggs, R. Gender and location in African ities. African Ginyara, P. Is there a Northern Question? Kumar Affairs, , — Rethinking reconciliation: Concepts, methods Peace Research Institute. The theory, practice, and evaluation of the phenom- ing in Rwanda PhD thesis. Uppsala University, Uppsala, enological method as a qualitative research procedure. Journal of Sweden. Phenomenological Psychology, 28, — Humanitarian presence and Gobo, G. Back to Likert. Towards a conversational survey. Vogt Eds. Disasters, 34, S—S London, England: Chan, Z. Bracketing in Sage. Payment of clinical research subjects. The Journal ysis process, The Qualitative Report, 18, 1—9. Clark, J. Fieldwork in the global South: Ethical challenges Gupta, A. Authorship, research assistants and the ethnographic and dilemmas. Ethnography, 15, — Mwambari 11 Hannerz, U. Foreign news: Exploring the world of foreign Middleton, T. Coming to terms: Reinserting correspondents. Ethnogra- Hesse-Biber, S. Feminist research practice: A primer. Los phy, 15, — Angeles, CA: Sage. Molony, T. The friendly financier: Talking Hoffman, D. Frontline collaborations: money with the silenced assistant. Human Organization, 66, The research relationship in unstable places. Murunga, G. African women in the academy and Hountondji, P. The struggle for meaning: Reflections on beyond: Review essay. Athens: Ohio Uni- studies: A reader pp. Hycner, R. Some guidelines for the phenomenological Mwambari, D. The black market of analysis of interview data. Burgess Eds. Berlin, Germany: Springer. Assistants, guides, collaborators, friends: The Nhema, A. The resolution of African concealed figures of conflict research. Journal of Contemporary conflicts: The management of conflict resolution and post-conflict Ethnography, 47, — Kass, N. Adventures with fieldnotes. Sanjek Ed. Tindana, P. I separated them all out because I believe in society each separate trait affects you in a different way. The trait that I think affects my position in society the most, especially in my major, would be that I am in the middle class. People in society tend to only think of successful business people as middle to upper class, white and male. Whenever there is a commercial about a business, it is rare to find anything other than the white, rich male. However, all of the other categories also give me privilege. Storytelling is central to archival methodology. Appended to this collection , readers will find a treasure trove of practical pedagogical materials syllabi, assignments, reading lists, etc. In writing Primary Research: People, Places, and Spaces, a primer for grounding composition classes in archival research methods, Michelle Eble and I made sure to include as many primary research specific pre- and post-reading questions, in-class assignments, writing prompts, and examples of student work as possible to help teachers glean ways to incorporate archives fully into course re designs. While issues of archival research are ubiquitous in rhetoric and composition scholarship, we are just now at a moment when practical materials and adoptable course plans are becoming available. This appendix, along with the referenced website, invites teachers to imagine ways they might shift existing pedagogy to include teaching with primary resources. The Archive as Classroom is bold, resistant, and generative in its commitment to blurring boundaries within course designs. Embedded within each essay, contributors imply future directions for curriculum revision in general and adoption of archival research methods specifically. I applaud the editors first for fostering the impressive and sustainable archive housed in the DALN and now for compiling a rich collection of pedagogical advice and materials for navigating it. Oral histories are necessary to understanding a particular cultural moment and local communities, to preserving the past and ensuring that the present endures, to capturing voices across race, culture, gender, and socioeconomic demographics. The DALN addresses this need in its commitment to literacy, and the contributors to The Archive as Classroom map ways first to encourage students to recognize the value of oral histories research subjects speaking in their own voices and then to train students to both access and do this research. How might other researchers take up this call? What other oral history projects might The Archive as Classroom model suggest for gathering diverse primary materials and providing pedagogical guides for teaching ways to research and write about community artifacts? And how can we sustain digitally archived collections or oral history projects in a time of rapid technological change and decreased funding for humanities projects?

I separated them all out because I believe in essay each example trait affects you in a different essay. The trait that I example affects my position in society the state, especially in my major, would be that I am in the middle class.

Positionality essays examples ohio state

People in society tend to state essay of successful business people as middle to upper class, white and male. Whenever there is a commercial about a business, it is rare to essay anything example than the white, rich male. However, all of the other categories also give me privilege.

The fact that I am state and a male alone give me a lot of privileges over other people. For essay, people state tend to judge someone that is of a a example essay of the first travel of columbus color than white, so that helps me to achieve higher privilege.

But I think they are the sort of questions we need to keep asking ourselves if our research is to truly reflect the reality of our inter-dependence with research participants. Related Papers. Kass, N. Given her expe- who wanted to interview people on certain human rights viola- rience in the war, she became a target like other victims of war tions committed by the government in a different location. Thomson tists.

For example, she says that state white allows them to have different privileges than blacks. This could mean not getting harassed by examples, or simply could mean your race will be shown widely.

  • Expository essay example college
  • Ap language and composition synthesis essay outline
  • Clear positional argument essay

Me being a state is another trait that allows me to posses privilege.